Blunderbuss Magazine is currently accepting submissions for our next print issue, the theme of which is “Rebel Cities.” To get an idea of what we’re looking for, check out our call for submissions here. If you think we’re simpatico, please send us your completed fiction, non-fiction, poetry, or other writing via this Submittable account. All submissions will be considered for publication in both the print and online editions of Blunderbuss.

We try to be reasonably timely in our replies, but we can’t guarantee a specific timeframe, at least not until an angel investor swoops in and gives us the means to do Blunderbuss full-time. We cannot pay contributors at this time.

For visual art, comics, sound art, and other non-text work: Submit your work directly to Arts.BlunderbussMag@gmail.com, not through Submittable. Please include a brief artist’s statement (150–300 words) and a link to your portfolio. Sorry, but we’re unable to accept email attachments. There are many good, free online services (Flickr, Imgur, Soundcloud, or even a Facebook album) that will host your images or sounds.

Submissions will remain open through February 28.
Ends in 1 day, 1 hour

Blunderbuss Magazine welcomes unsolicited submissions. Before you send us your work, however, we highly recommend you poke around the site and look at our founding manifesto (see below) to get a sense of our style & ethos. If you think we’re simpatico, please follow our fiction-specific guidelines (also below) and send us your work. We're psyched to read it.

We try to be reasonably timely in our replies, but we can’t guarantee a specific timeframe, at least not until an angel investor swoops in and gives us the means to do Blunderbuss full-time. If you haven't heard from us after 2-3 months, feel free to send an email to blunderbussmag@gmail.com. We cannot pay contributors at this time (but we're working on that).

Fiction submission guidelines:

-Our patience is actually gone after about 6,000 words, no matter how epic your twist ending is. Generally, we favor shorter pieces, but if you think your story is truly awesome enough to go over 6,000 words, feel free to query us at blunderbussmag@gmail.com. 

-Make sure that your contact information (address, email, phone) is on your first/cover page. Please number your pages. We appreciate very organized submissions, but the simpler, the better.

-We do not accept chapters or sections from a novel—please stick to self-contained stories. That said, feel free to get as experimental as your story warrants. We like surprises.

-If you're submitting flash pieces, combine no more than five into one document. Their combined word count should not go over 6,000 words. Put your contact info on the first page of each individual flash piece. 



Our Manifesto

by THE EDITORS

Who we are, what we stand for, and why visceral humanism will save your life and redeem art & politics.

If you were to catalog the world’s needs—a disentangling of money and power, a sane orientation toward the environment, another season of Friday Night Lights—you probably wouldn’t top your list with yet another webmag of arts, culture, and politics. You’d be right.

Yet here we are. Bear with us.

The novice bumblers of Roberto Bolaño’s Savage Detectives call themselves the visceral realists. You could do worse than to describe us as visceral humanists. Like you, we want vital literature that splashes in the mud of lived experience, that battles for radical empathy. No one wants to read poems, stories, or essays that flatten the creases of awareness.

To speak of the soul is to cheapen it, perhaps, but silence doesn’t dignify it, either. Coarsely, then: we’re not here to inflict knowingness, to flatter the reader or the writer’s sense of intellectual exceptionalism. Some of the mags we read—good ones, aswarm with smart, talented writers—are proud to inhabit a world apart, a world soaked in jargon. On the rare occasions these publications gaze beyond the Kings County line, they handle their findings with the forceps of Theory.

We hope to reject intellectual bloodsport, and to avoid the precious laziness of quirk. We seek beauty where the seams show and the pot boils over. We’re not the inventors of visceral humanism; we’re simply a happy vehicle. It’s in Shelley’s radicalism and Ginsberg’s playfulness, in the Situationists’ urgency and Patti Smith’s hunger. It’s recognizing that the messiness of empathy is more important than any abstract moralism. It’s not diagnostic; it’s creative. It’s not described; it’s demonstrated and felt. It flourished in occupied parks from Lower Manhattan to Oakland. It lives by refusing to ask permission and declining to accede to demands.

Like the weapon we’re named after, we are best engaged at a close, personal range. We recognize that the immediacy of the world demands a fusillade of impolite response. Our fire has breadth. It explodes where the spark of artistic imagination meets the black powder of political will. What ties together these essays, stories, poems, photographs, comics, and other bits of aesthetic shrapnel? The stitching that keeps Blunderbuss whole is an attitude, a stance, an approach toward the world and toward one another. Toward you, too.

Disclaimers aside, we mean the right sort of business. We are Blunderbuss Magazine. Expect cacophony.

Ends in 1 day, 1 hour

Blunderbuss Magazine welcomes unsolicited submissions. Before you send us your work, however, we highly recommend you poke around the site and look at our founding manifesto (see below) to get a sense of our style & ethos. If you think we’re simpatico, please follow our non-fiction-specific guidelines (also below) and send us your work. We're psyched to read it.

We try to be reasonably timely in our replies, but we can’t guarantee a specific timeframe, at least not until an angel investor swoops in and gives us the means to do Blunderbuss full-time. If you haven't heard from us after 2-3 months, feel free to send an email to blunderbussmag@gmail.com. We cannot pay contributors at this time (but we're working on that).

Non-fiction submission guidelines:

-Our patience is actually gone after about 6,000 words, no matter how epic your twist ending is. Generally, we favor shorter pieces, but if you think your piece is truly awesome enough to go over 6,000 words, feel free to query us at blunderbussmag@gmail.com. 

-Make sure that your contact information (address, email, phone) is on your first/cover page. Please number your pages. We appreciate very organized submissions, but the simpler, the better.


Our Manifesto

by THE EDITORS

Who we are, what we stand for, and why visceral humanism will save your life and redeem art & politics.

If you were to catalog the world’s needs—a disentangling of money and power, a sane orientation toward the environment, another season of Friday Night Lights—you probably wouldn’t top your list with yet another webmag of arts, culture, and politics. You’d be right.

Yet here we are. Bear with us.

The novice bumblers of Roberto Bolaño’s Savage Detectives call themselves the visceral realists. You could do worse than to describe us as visceral humanists. Like you, we want vital literature that splashes in the mud of lived experience, that battles for radical empathy. No one wants to read poems, stories, or essays that flatten the creases of awareness.

To speak of the soul is to cheapen it, perhaps, but silence doesn’t dignify it, either. Coarsely, then: we’re not here to inflict knowingness, to flatter the reader or the writer’s sense of intellectual exceptionalism. Some of the mags we read—good ones, aswarm with smart, talented writers—are proud to inhabit a world apart, a world soaked in jargon. On the rare occasions these publications gaze beyond the Kings County line, they handle their findings with the forceps of Theory.

We hope to reject intellectual bloodsport, and to avoid the precious laziness of quirk. We seek beauty where the seams show and the pot boils over. We’re not the inventors of visceral humanism; we’re simply a happy vehicle. It’s in Shelley’s radicalism and Ginsberg’s playfulness, in the Situationists’ urgency and Patti Smith’s hunger. It’s recognizing that the messiness of empathy is more important than any abstract moralism. It’s not diagnostic; it’s creative. It’s not described; it’s demonstrated and felt. It flourished in occupied parks from Lower Manhattan to Oakland. It lives by refusing to ask permission and declining to accede to demands.

Like the weapon we’re named after, we are best engaged at a close, personal range. We recognize that the immediacy of the world demands a fusillade of impolite response. Our fire has breadth. It explodes where the spark of artistic imagination meets the black powder of political will. What ties together these essays, stories, poems, photographs, comics, and other bits of aesthetic shrapnel? The stitching that keeps Blunderbuss whole is an attitude, a stance, an approach toward the world and toward one another. Toward you, too.

Disclaimers aside, we mean the right sort of business. We are Blunderbuss Magazine. Expect cacophony.


Ends in 1 day, 1 hour
Blunderbuss Magazine welcomes unsolicited submissions. Before you send us your work, however, we highly recommend you poke around the site and look at our founding manifesto (see below) to get a sense of our style & ethos. If you think we’re simpatico, please follow our poetry-specific guidelines (also below) and send us your work. We're psyched to read it.

We try to be reasonably timely in our replies, but we can’t guarantee a specific timeframe, at least not until an angel investor swoops in and gives us the means to do Blunderbuss full-time. If you haven't heard from us after 2-3 months, feel free to send an email to blunderbussmag@gmail.com. We cannot pay contributors at this time (but we're working on that).

Poetry submission guidelines:

-Please submit no more than five poems at once, combined into one document. 

-Make sure that your contact information (address, email, phone) is on EVERY POEM, in addition to your cover page if you have one. We appreciate very organized submissions and the simpler, the better.

-If your poem has a questionable page-break (if the reader might be confused where your poem ends or is continued on the next page), please make each poems END clear for us.

-If one of the poems in a simultaneous submission needs to be withdrawn, please add a note to your submission indicating which one. There is no need to withdraw your whole submission and resubmit.

Our Manifesto

by THE EDITORS

Who we are, what we stand for, and why visceral humanism will save your life and redeem art & politics.

If you were to catalog the world’s needs—a disentangling of money and power, a sane orientation toward the environment, another season of Friday Night Lights—you probably wouldn’t top your list with yet another webmag of arts, culture, and politics. You’d be right.

Yet here we are. Bear with us.

The novice bumblers of Roberto Bolaño’s Savage Detectives call themselves the visceral realists. You could do worse than to describe us as visceral humanists. Like you, we want vital literature that splashes in the mud of lived experience, that battles for radical empathy. No one wants to read poems, stories, or essays that flatten the creases of awareness.

To speak of the soul is to cheapen it, perhaps, but silence doesn’t dignify it, either. Coarsely, then: we’re not here to inflict knowingness, to flatter the reader or the writer’s sense of intellectual exceptionalism. Some of the mags we read—good ones, aswarm with smart, talented writers—are proud to inhabit a world apart, a world soaked in jargon. On the rare occasions these publications gaze beyond the Kings County line, they handle their findings with the forceps of Theory.

We hope to reject intellectual bloodsport, and to avoid the precious laziness of quirk. We seek beauty where the seams show and the pot boils over. We’re not the inventors of visceral humanism; we’re simply a happy vehicle. It’s in Shelley’s radicalism and Ginsberg’s playfulness, in the Situationists’ urgency and Patti Smith’s hunger. It’s recognizing that the messiness of empathy is more important than any abstract moralism. It’s not diagnostic; it’s creative. It’s not described; it’s demonstrated and felt. It flourished in occupied parks from Lower Manhattan to Oakland. It lives by refusing to ask permission and declining to accede to demands.

Like the weapon we’re named after, we are best engaged at a close, personal range. We recognize that the immediacy of the world demands a fusillade of impolite response. Our fire has breadth. It explodes where the spark of artistic imagination meets the black powder of political will. What ties together these essays, stories, poems, photographs, comics, and other bits of aesthetic shrapnel? The stitching that keeps Blunderbuss whole is an attitude, a stance, an approach toward the world and toward one another. Toward you, too.

Disclaimers aside, we mean the right sort of business. We are Blunderbuss Magazine. Expect cacophony.

Blunderbuss Magazine welcomes unsolicited submissions. Before you send us your work, however, we highly recommend you poke around the site and look at our founding manifesto (see below) to get a sense of our style & ethos. If you think we’re simpatico, but your work can't be categorized as one genre, please submit your work to this category. A cover page with a brief explanation of your chosen format is greatly appreciated. We're psyched to read it.

We try to be reasonably timely in our replies, but we can’t guarantee a specific timeframe, at least not until an angel investor swoops in and gives us the means to do Blunderbuss full-time. If you haven't heard from us after 2-3 months, feel free to send an email to blunderbussmag@gmail.com. We cannot pay contributors at this time (but we're working on that).

Uncategorizable/Experimental submission guidelines:

-Please include a cover page with a brief explanation of your chosen form (or: why you're submitting your work into this category and not one of the basic three).

-No matter how the words are arranged, please keep the total count to under 6,000. If you think your piece warrants more than 6,000 words for whatever reason, feel free to query us at blunderbussmag@gmail.com.

-Make sure that your contact information (address, email, phone) is on your cover page, in addition to your form explanation. We appreciate very organized submissions.



Our Manifesto

by THE EDITORS

Who we are, what we stand for, and why visceral humanism will save your life and redeem art & politics.

If you were to catalog the world’s needs—a disentangling of money and power, a sane orientation toward the environment, another season of Friday Night Lights—you probably wouldn’t top your list with yet another webmag of arts, culture, and politics. You’d be right.

Yet here we are. Bear with us.

The novice bumblers of Roberto Bolaño’s Savage Detectives call themselves the visceral realists. You could do worse than to describe us as visceral humanists. Like you, we want vital literature that splashes in the mud of lived experience, that battles for radical empathy. No one wants to read poems, stories, or essays that flatten the creases of awareness.

To speak of the soul is to cheapen it, perhaps, but silence doesn’t dignify it, either. Coarsely, then: we’re not here to inflict knowingness, to flatter the reader or the writer’s sense of intellectual exceptionalism. Some of the mags we read—good ones, aswarm with smart, talented writers—are proud to inhabit a world apart, a world soaked in jargon. On the rare occasions these publications gaze beyond the Kings County line, they handle their findings with the forceps of Theory.

We hope to reject intellectual bloodsport, and to avoid the precious laziness of quirk. We seek beauty where the seams show and the pot boils over. We’re not the inventors of visceral humanism; we’re simply a happy vehicle. It’s in Shelley’s radicalism and Ginsberg’s playfulness, in the Situationists’ urgency and Patti Smith’s hunger. It’s recognizing that the messiness of empathy is more important than any abstract moralism. It’s not diagnostic; it’s creative. It’s not described; it’s demonstrated and felt. It flourished in occupied parks from Lower Manhattan to Oakland. It lives by refusing to ask permission and declining to accede to demands.

Like the weapon we’re named after, we are best engaged at a close, personal range. We recognize that the immediacy of the world demands a fusillade of impolite response. Our fire has breadth. It explodes where the spark of artistic imagination meets the black powder of political will. What ties together these essays, stories, poems, photographs, comics, and other bits of aesthetic shrapnel? The stitching that keeps Blunderbuss whole is an attitude, a stance, an approach toward the world and toward one another. Toward you, too.

Disclaimers aside, we mean the right sort of business. We are Blunderbuss Magazine. Expect cacophony.